Reading Ever On: March 2017

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Here are the books we read last month and what we thought of them…


Gowdy Cannon

North! Or Be Eaten (Wingfeather Saga Book 2) by Andrew Peterson

North! or Be EatenI wrote about the first book in this series last month and I finished the other three in March. They are excellent and get better with each volume. They will be added to my rotation of favorite fantasy series, of which I read at least a little every day. This one has my favorite scene of the Wingfeather Saga, when Janner faces a situation so dark and discouraging it was like Andrew Peterson read my journal from my worst days and made it into a fantasy plot. This book is hard to put down start to finish.


The Monster In The Hollows (Wingfeather Saga Book 3) by Andrew Peterson

The Monster in the HollowsThe action-packed adventure continues in the third installment and it gets really good with the three main character siblings starting at a new school. Having done this before in my personal life, I was enthralled. And the climax, centering around the book title, is wild and unpredictable. I am ready to read this again.


The Warden and the Wolf King (Wingfeather Saga Book 4) by Andrew Peterson

The Warden and the Wolf KingPeterson set the bar high in the first three and the pay off in this concluding volume (much longer than the other books) is worth it. There are secondary characters developed in an alternating scene (this happens in prior books but not as in depth as this one). I admit I didn’t appreciate this as much as I could have if I had loved those characters as much as the main ones, but the overall story and ending is emotional and satisfying. I recommend this series to anyone who loves Narnia, Hogwarts or Middle Earth or even if you do not.


The Art of Biblical Narrative by Robert Alter

The Art of Biblical NarrativeWritten by a Jew and rather short for a volume on biblical interpretation (183 pages, since it focuses on one genre of the Bible), the thinking in this book is levels beyond what I am capable of and I thoroughly benefited as a result. A professor at Moody recommended it to me years ago as a book way out of the common Christian sphere on the topic and this was at least my third reading. Highly recommended for hermeneutics junkies and anyone interested in how to get into the world behind the Bible text to get its meaning. If nothing else, I would read it just to see how the author explains why the Genesis 38 story of Judah and Tamar interrupts the Joseph narrative.


The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander

The New Jim CroweI’m nothing if not teachable so I read this in an attempt to try to understand the thoughts behind many who maintain that there is still a significant amount of racial injustice in the US, notably in the judicial system. As a white male I want to read what people who think differently than me have to say but also to filter it critically.


The Wayside School Series by Louis Sachar

The Wayside School CollectionWeird and random is my wheelhouse and so this trilogy of children’s books has been my absolute favorite since the late 80s when they first came out. You have a boy who counts with the wrong numbers but always gets the right answer. You have a girl who loves dead rats. You don’t have a 19th story to your building (the builder said he was very sorry). The original, Sideways Stories from Wayside School, was so popular Sachar wrote the sequels due to an avalanche of fan demand. I wish he’d never stopped. Wayside School Is Falling Down and Wayside School Gets a Little Stranger take the character development of the first book and add in zany and nonsensical plots that make me laugh and leave me giddy. Perfect reading for small kids who love silliness and for adults who are under great stress (hand raised for me these days buying my first house), I will be reading these til I die. I can’t wait to read them to my kids.




Ben Plunkett

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire by J. K. Rowling

Harry Potter and the Goblet of FireJust a few days ago I reviewed Goblet of Fire, which you can see here. I will dispense with regurgitating everything I said, but I will warn you once again that you should be prepared for a big book. But that will very likely mean nothing even if you are, like me, normally a very, very slow reader. What would usually take me several months to read, only took me a little over one. And I promise you won’t regret the adventure. There is a nearly seamless flow and flawless writing from section to section. The only flaw in this book is Rowling’s traditional information vomitation courtesy of our big baddy Lord Voldemort.

If you haven’t read The Sorceror’s Stone, The Chamber of Secrets, and The Prisoner of Azkaban yet, you will want to read those classics first before delving into this masterpiece.




Mike Lytle

Making Sense of God: An Invitation to the Skeptical by Tim Keller

Making Sense of GodI am not a Calvinist, but I firmly believe I am predestined to enjoy anything that Keller writes. Whether he is discussing prayer, dealing with pain and suffering, or the importance of work in our lives I always find his books thought provoking and convicting. That being said, I especially like the way he handles apologetics. His newest book, Making Sense of God tackles many common objections that religious skeptics have and explains how rational and reasonable the Christian faith really is. Keller doesn’t belittle those he disagrees with and always presents his arguments in a calm, measured tone. I also appreciate how he is more focused on the big picture than trying to prove each and every small point. This is a good read for believers and skeptics alike.




Phill Lytle

The Bands of Mourning: A Mistborn Novel by Brandon Sanderson

The Bands of MourningThis is the third installment of a four book series. It’s the second series set in the Mistborn world. At this point, Sanderson is working at a level most authors would envy. His writing is at turns exciting, intense, funny, emotional, and always interesting. With great characters and a wonderfully complex plot, The Bands of Mourning is further evidence that Sanderson is at the top of his game and he isn’t going anywhere any time soon.


Taliesin (The Pendragon Cycle, Book 1) by Stephen R. Lawhead

TaliesinThe Pendragon Cycle is Lawhead’s unique take on the Arthurian legends. He weaves the myth of Atlantis with Fifth and Sixth century Britain to create a world that is both believable and fantastic all at the same time. The story is engaging and vibrant. The themes are rich and complex. The characters are bigger than life yet completely relatable. I’ve read this series at least seven times and I never tire of venturing back into the world of bards and warriors, princesses and prophets, priests and kings.




Nathan Patton

Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets by J. K. Rowling

Harry Potter and the Chamber of SecretsI am continuing to read this series with my sons (their first time, my billionth), and they are continuing to enjoy it immensely.

Check out fellow REO contributer Ben Plunkett’s review of this book here.


Destiny of the Republic: A Tale of Madness, Medicine and the Murder of a President by Candice Millard

Destiny of the RepublicI didn’t really know anything about James Garfield, other than that he was a president of the United States and was assassinated, before reading this fascinating book. Not only does the author tell Garfield’s history, but she also includes a biography of his murderer, Charles J. Guiteau, and a selective biography of inventor Alexander Graham Bell who worked tirelessly to help save Garfield’s life. In addition to the political history, this book also explains much of the scientific and medical history of that time and how the medical practices of that time especially may have contributed to Garfield’s death.

The story of James Garfield the man was absolutely captivating. He could have been one of the greatest leaders of our country rather than being remembered only for having died while in office.

I hope to find a good biography on Alexander Graham Bell to read soon.


Staff

We are staff and we are legion.

7 thoughts on “Reading Ever On: March 2017

  • April 12, 2017 at 9:12 pm
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    I really enjoy reading what you write about your reading. Thanks!

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    • April 13, 2017 at 2:59 pm
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      We enjoy writing about what we read so you can read what we write about what we read.

      Reply
      • April 14, 2017 at 12:26 pm
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        Phill, I enjoyed reading your comment about writing about what we read so that Amy can read what we write about what we read.

        Reply
        • April 14, 2017 at 8:39 pm
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          Nathan, I read that we writers wrote reading writings read by Amy the reader who reads our reading writings and that Amy the reading writer will also perhaps write what we too shall read.

          Reply
  • April 14, 2017 at 2:13 pm
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    I’m with you fellas.

    Reply
  • April 18, 2017 at 3:54 am
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    Robert Alter! Nice.

    Reply
    • April 18, 2017 at 8:38 am
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      It was a welcome break from Andreas Kostenberger. Although I have nothing but respect for him. Since he’s a billion times smarter than me.

      Reply

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